Browsing: Nature of Reality

‘With so many people (many indeed being iconic scientific and historical figures) experiencing what they are supposedly not meant to, according to materialistic thought, the reasonable individual might be forgiven for wondering if there is something more to consciousness than our present “scientific” paradigms would have us believe. Can we go further than questioning the assumed legitimacy of orthodox materialistic theories which reduce consciousness to a mere epiphenomenon (by-product) of physical matter (the brain) and even—heaven forbid—suggest that they are not merely incomplete, but actually types of superstitions in themselves?’

Read more: Science and the Paranormal – The Question of Consciousness

‘The transformation from sleep-walking in the matrix to wide awake in the vast splendor of the universe is often triggered by a low point in life, a dark night of the soul, if you will. This is when the gift of being human is lost among the ever-present morass of confusion, chaos, madness and suffering. What carries us out of this morass is inspiration, which so often comes in the form of wisdom offered by our philosophers and sages, those among us who’ve taken the hero’s journey and have returned with a prize.’

Read more: The Meaning of Life According to Terence McKenna

‘There are some who believe that our universe is a massive hologram, in which 3-D reality as we know it exists within a two-dimensional boundary.

While it may seem radical, the idea has recently regained traction, after a study published earlier this year found that deviations in the universe’s radiation ‘baby picture’ could be predicted using the holographic principle.

Essentially, it would mean that the world around us is a complex projection – and, as the workings of the cosmos still largely remain a mystery, the findings are an ‘important step forward’ in figuring out the truth, a new Life Noggin video explains.’

Read more: Do we live in a HOLOGRAM? Video reveals controversial theory


David Icke – The Holographic Illusion of Reality

‘Conceiving of the Separation Game

In most of the multitude of realities that “we” created and then played within we knew, to varying degrees, what we were — creator beings that are integral parts of the One creator being — Source consciousness, prime creator, God, or whatever else you like to call it.

But within this great diversity of realities, there were none in which we completely forgot what we were — and this possibility intrigued us immensely. What would that be like and what could it teach us? It certainly seemed like it might be very interesting, to say the least.

So in our eternal quest to know ourselves and the nature of our existence we set out to create this new type of reality — one where we would completely lose our connection to our divine source, forget that we are creators and all integral parts of One universal consciousness. A reality where we would think we were separate from the creator and each other. A reality where we would experience the greatest degree of individuality and separation anywhere in the Multiverse — a reality that could aptly be called “The Separation Game.”’

Read more: Constructing the Separation Game

There is a rift between the world as we see it and the world as it really is. Science and spirit are our primary tools for closing this gap in our understanding, and at the edge of this rift has always been psychic phenomenon like telepathy, premonition and the familiar sixth sense.

Many people experience these phenomenon with regularity, yet they escape scientific explanation, even though a large and historically deep body of experiential and anecdotal evidence exists. This library of evidence prevents dismissal of the psychic as either a figment of the imagination or the existence of an archaic belief system that still has imprints on the mind. This evidence implores to investigate further rather than reject.

Read more: Science Unravels the Mystery of Everyday Telepathy

‘I have been studying our Sun for some years, focusing on the influence of erratic solar behaviour (erratic from a modern human perspective) on the course of human development and civilisation. One of my major conclusions is that the last ice age ended abruptly circa 9700 bce due to a major solar outburst (or series of outbursts). Solar activity is intimately tied to climate changes on Earth, which in turn have major effects on life on our planet, including humanity.

Following the solar agitation and disturbances that ended the last ice age and possibly continued for several millennia, during the last 8,000 years or so the Sun has been relatively stable, with periods of quiescence.1 For example, in historical times during the Maunder Minimum (circa 1645 to 1715) the Sun appeared to “shut down” or go dormant (as reflected in the rarity of sunspots), corresponding on Earth to the middle of the “Little Ice Age” (which in totality lasted from circa 1500 to circa 1860). At the end of the “Little Ice Age,” in 1859, the Sun “burped,” spewing out two coronal mass ejections (CMEs), accompanied by solar flares and other solar activity, that hit Earth. ‘

Read more: Is Our Sun Concious?

‘The top brass of CERN, which operates the the largest particle collider in the world, is attending Bilderberg this year, rekindling fears CERN will cause unfathomable changes to human civilization and may even lead to parallel dimensions.

Fabiola Gianotti, the Director General of CERN, is an unusual participant at the elitist meeting known mainly for shaping geopolitical events, but CERN does have a strange relationship with the elite – and its collider has been criticized for harnessing too much power humanity can handle.

The collider reportedly generates a magnetic field 100,000 times more powerful than that of Earth’s, a concern because human and animal biology, particularly the pineal gland, interacts with the Earth’s magnetic field.’

Read more: CERN Director Visits Bilderberg, Fueling Fears Collider Opens Doors to ‘Extra Dimensions’

‘It’s called magnetoreception, and it refers to the ability to perceive magnetic fields. Several animals use it to find their way over long distances by aligning themselves with the Earth’s magnetic field. Sea turtles. honeybees, spiny lobsters, dolphins, migratory birds, and more all have a magnetic compass which allows them to use the information that’s coded into magnetic fields. We know little beyond that, however. How they use them, how they sense them, and what information they are getting from them remains up for speculation. For all we know, these magnetic fields could be used for much more than navigation for certain species.

According to Joe Kirschvink, the geophysicist at the California Institute of Technology who is currently testing humans for a magnetic sense, “it’s part of our evolutionary history. Magnetoreception may be the primal sense.”

A recent study published by Kirschvink in the journal Nature Communications suggests that a protein in the human retina, when placed into fruit flies, has the ability to detect magnetic fields. The research claims that it can serve as a magneto sensor, but whether or not humans actually use it in this way is unknown.’

Read more: Scientists Discover that Humans Have a ‘Magnetic 6th Sense’ to Detect Something We Can’t Even See

Flora may be able to detect the sounds of flowing water or munching insects

‘Pseudoscientific claims that music helps plants grow have been made for decades, despite evidence that is shaky at best. Yet new research suggests some flora may be capable of sensing sounds, such as the gurgle of water through a pipe or the buzzing of insects.

In a recent study, Monica Gagliano, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Western Australia, and her colleagues placed pea seedlings in pots shaped like an upside-down Y. One arm of each pot was placed in either a tray of water or a coiled plastic tube through which water flowed; the other arm had only soil. The roots grew toward the arm of the pipe with the fluid, regardless of whether it was easily accessible or hidden inside the tubing.

“They just knew the water was there, even if the only thing to detect was the sound of it flowing inside the pipe,” Gagliano says. Yet when the seedlings were given a choice between the water tube and some moistened soil, their roots favored the latter. Gagliano hypothesizes that these plants use sound waves to detect water at a distance but follow moisture gradients to home in on their target when it is closer.’

Read more: Can Plants Hear?

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