Go Back   David Icke's Official Forums > Main Forums > Hidden Science / Advanced Technology / Top Secret
Register FAQ Chat Social Groups Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 16-04-2012, 03:51 PM   #281
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default Cosmic Dance Of Shiva

edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 04:01 PM   #282
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 04:08 PM   #283
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 04:23 PM   #284
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

HINDUISM -- SCIENTIFICALLY proven RELIGION (part 3 of 3)
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 04:24 PM   #285
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default Hindu Concept of the Beginning and End of Universe



hmmm....what else could be there then
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 04:28 PM   #286
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Question

New Thought Movement Home Page http://websyte.com/alan/
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2012, 12:39 AM   #287
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

Graphitic Carbon Materials, Chemistry and Physics of


17th - 22nd June 2012 http://www.nature.com/natureevents/s...and_Physics_of
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-04-2012, 12:47 AM   #288
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default 'Cosmic Ray Origin Still Mysterious.' .....or

Cosmic Rays: They Aren’t What We Thought They Were

One of the leading candidates for where cosmic rays come from is gamma ray bursts, and physicists were hoping a huge Antarctic detector called the IceCube Neutrino Observatory would confirm that theory. But …Universe Today · 4/18/2012

Mysterious cosmic rays leave scientists in the dark
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-...s-in-the-dark/
http://images.sciencedaily.com/2012/04/120418135035.jpg

Science News


... from universities, journals, and other research organizations





Save Email Print Share http://phys.org/news/2012-04-highest...y-icecube.html




Where Do the Highest-Energy Cosmic Rays Come From? Probably Not from Gamma-Ray Bursts


ScienceDaily (Apr. 18, 2012) — Some rare cosmic rays pack an astonishing wallop, with energies prodigiously greater than particles in human-made accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider. Their sources are unknown, although scientists favor active galacti nuclei or gamma-ray bursts. If so, gamma-ray bursts should produce ultra-high-energy neutrinos, but scientists searching for these with IceCube, the giant neutrino telescope at the South Pole have found exactly zero. The mystery deepens.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

See Also:

Space & Time
•Cosmic Rays
•Black Holes
•Space Telescopes

Matter & Energy
•Quantum Physics
•Physics
•Detectors

Strange Science

Reference
•Neutrino
•Compton Gamma Ray Observatory
•Gamma ray burst
•Subatomic particle


The IceCube neutrino telescope encompasses a cubic kilometer of clear Antarctic ice under the South Pole, a volume seeded with an array of 5,160 sensitive digital optical modules (DOMs) that precisely track the direction and energy of speeding muons, massive cousins of the electron that are created when neutrinos collide with atoms in the ice. The IceCube Collaboration recently announced the results of an exhaustive search for high-energy neutrinos that would likely be produced if the violent extragalactic explosions known as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

"According to a leading model, we would have expected to see 8.4 events corresponding to GRB production of neutrinos in the IceCube data used for this search," says Spencer Klein of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), who is a long-time member of the IceCube Collaboration. "We didn't see any, which indicates that GRBs are not the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays."

"This result represents a coming-of-age of neutrino astronomy," says Nathan Whitehorn from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who led the recent GRB research with Peter Redl of the University of Maryland. "IceCube, while still under construction, was able to rule out 15 years of predictions and has begun to challenge one of only two major possibilities for the origin of the highest-energy cosmic rays, namely gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei."

Redl says, "While not finding a neutrino signal originating from GRBs was disappointing, this is the first neutrino astronomy result that is able to strongly constrain extra-galactic astrophysics models, and therefore marks the beginning of an exciting new era of neutrino astronomy."

The IceCube Collaboration's report on the search appears in the April 19, 2012, issue of the journal Nature.

Blazing fireballs and nature's accelerators

Cosmic rays are energetic particles from deep in outer space -- predominately protons, the bare nuclei of hydrogen atoms, plus some heavier atomic nuclei. Most probably acquire their energy when naturally accelerated by exploding stars. A few rare cosmic rays pack an astonishing wallop, however, with energies prodigiously greater than the highest ever attained by human-made accelerators like CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Their sources are a mystery.

"Nature is capable of accelerating elementary particles to macroscopic energies," says Francis Halzen, IceCube's principal investigator and a professor of physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are basically only two ideas on how she does this: in gravitationally driven particle flows near the supermassive black holes at the centers of active galaxies, and in the collapse of stars to a black hole, seen by astronomers as gamma ray bursts."

Klein, the deputy director of Berkeley Lab's Nuclear Science Division (NSD, explains that in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) "the black holes suck in matter and eject enormous particle jets, perpendicular to the galactic disk, which could act as strong linear accelerators." Of gamma-ray bursts he says, "Some GRBs are thought to be collapses of supermassive stars -- hypernova -- while others are thought to be collisions of black holes with other black holes or neutron stars. Both types produce brief but intense blasts of radiation."

The massive fireballs move away from the explosion at nearly the speed of light, releasing most of their energy as gamma rays. The fireballs that give rise to this radiation might also accelerate particles to very high energies through a jet mechanism similar to that in AGNs, although compressed into a much smaller volume.

A fireball produced in a black-hole collision or by the collapse of a gigantic star can form jets in which protons and heavier nuclei are accelerated and shock waves produce a burst of gamma rays. The fireball model also predicts the creation of very high energy neutrinos, which ought to be detectable shortly after the gamma-ray burst becomes visible from Earth. (Image credit Dana Berry and NASA)

Accelerated protons in a GRB's jets should interact with the intense gamma-ray background and strong magnetic fields to produce neutrinos with energies about five percent of the proton energy, together with much higher-energy neutrinos near the end of the acceleration process.

Neutrinos come in three different types that change and mix as they travel to Earth; the total flux can be estimated from the muon neutrinos that IceCube concentrates on. The muons these neutrinos create can travel up to 10 kilometers through the Antarctic ice. Thus many neutrino interactions occur outside the actual dimensions of the IceCube array but are nevertheless visible to IceCube's detectors, effectively enlarging the telescope's aperture.

"The way we search for GRB neutrinos is that we build a huge detector and then we just watch and wait," says Klein. "When it comes to detecting neutrinos, size really does matter."

IceCube watches with its over 5,000 DOMs, digital optical modules conceived, designed, and proven by Berkeley Lab physicists and engineers, which detect the faint light from each passing muon. Scientists can rely on their remarkable dependability to wait as long as necessary. Almost no failures occurred after the DOMs were installed; 98 percent are working perfectly and another one percent are usable. Now frozen in the ice, they will never be seen again.

IceCube records a million times more muon tracks moving downward through the ice than upward, mainly debris from direct cosmic-ray hits on the surface or secondary products of cosmic-ray collisions with Earth's atmosphere. Muons moving upward, however, signal neutrinos that have passed all the way through Earth. When the telescope is searching for bright neutrino sources in the northern sky, the planet makes a marvelous filter.

Zeroing in on gamma-ray bursts

A network of satellites circles the globe and reports almost 700 GRBs each year, which readily stand out from the cosmic background. They're timed, their positions are triangulated, and the data are distributed by an international group of researchers. Some blaze for less than two seconds and others for a few minutes. Neutrinos they produce should arrive at IceCube during the burst or close to it.

"IceCube's precision timing and charge resolution, plus its large size, allow it to precisely determine where a neutrino comes from -- often to within one degree," says Lisa Gerhardt of Berkeley Lab, whose research has focused on detecting ultra-high-energy neutrino interactions. Indeed, a GRB neutrino should send a muon track through the ice with an angular resolution of about one degree with respect to the GRB's position in the sky.

IceCube researchers sifted through data on 307 GRBs from two periods in 2008 and 2009 when IceCube was still under construction, looking for records of muon trails coincident in time and space with GRBs. (Forty strings, with 60 DOMs each, had been installed by 2008, and 59 strings by 2009. The finished IceCube has 86 strings.) The fireball model predicted that when the expected flux from all the samples had been summed, at least 8.4 related muon events would be found within 10 degrees of a GRB during the seconds or minutes when it was blazing brightly.

"Different calculations of the neutrino flux from GRBs are based on slightly different assumptions about how the neutrinos are produced and on uncertainties such as how fast the fireball is moving toward us," says Klein. "Among the published predictions, the lowest estimate of neutrino production is about a quarter of what the fireball model predicts. That's barely consistent with our zero observations."

Says Halzen, "After observing gamma-ray bursts for two years, we have not detected the telltale neutrinos for cosmic ray acceleration."

If it's likely that GRBs aren't up to the task of accelerating cosmic rays to ultra-high-energies, what are the options? Klein points to a salient fact about natural accelerators: a small, rapidly spinning object must accelerate particles very rapidly; this requires an extremely energy-dense environment, and there are many ways the particles could lose energy during the acceleration process.

"But remember the other popular model of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, active galactic nuclei," says Klein. "GRBs are small, but AGNs are big -- great big accelerators that may be able to accelerate particles to very high energies without significant loss."

Are AGNs the real source of the highest-energy cosmic rays? IceCube has looked for neutrinos from active galactic nuclei, but as yet the data sets are not sensitive enough to set significant limits. For now, IceCube has nothing to say on the subject -- beyond the fact that the fireball model of GRBs can't meet the specs.

Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:




Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:


|

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Story Source:


The above story is reprinted from materials provided by DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Journal Reference:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0418135035.htm

http://www.bing.com/news/search?q=wh...from&FORM=EWRE

Researchers at UA find cosmic ray theory flaw

Findings contradict 15 years of predictions

By Wayne Grayson
Staff Writer
http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/articl...NEWS/120419687

Published: Friday, April 20, 2012 at 3:30 a.m.
........... theory on the scientific mystery behind the origin of cosmic rays.



The paper, published in Thursday's edition of the science journal Nature, is based on research done at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica.

Though cosmic rays were first discovered 100 years ago, scientists have yet to nail down exactly how they're made. According to a release from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where IceCube's principal investigator Francis Halzen is a physics professor, cosmic rays are electrically charged particles, such as protons, that travel through space and strike the Earth from all sides.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2012, 11:08 AM   #289
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

From lemons to lemonade: Reaction uses carbon dioxide to make carbon-based semiconductor
Nanomedicine: Quantum dots appear safe in pioneering study on primates
New finding may hold key to Gaia hypothesis of Earth as living organism
New silicon memory chip developed
>>>
Group finds circadian clock common to almost all life forms

while..back
2 Bronze Age...
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 04:20 PM   #290
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default





Last edited by edit; 03-06-2012 at 04:35 PM.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 11:31 PM   #291
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default The Presence of the Past

Rupert Sheldrake: The Presence of the Past (excerpt) - Thinking Allowed w/ Jeffrey Mishlove

Last edited by edit; 03-07-2012 at 11:37 PM.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 11:36 PM   #292
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default here and now ...hear

A New Science of Life (excerpt) - A Thinking Allowed

Last edited by edit; 03-07-2012 at 11:39 PM.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2013, 09:08 PM   #293
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=23599
Quote:
In a classic laser hologram, a laser beam is split. One portion is reflected off an object – a china teacup, say – the other is reflected by several mirrors. They are then reunited and captured on a piece of photographic film. The result on the plate – which represents the interference pattern of these waves – resembles nothing more than a set of squiggles or concentric circles. However, when you shine a light beam from the same kind of laser through the film, what you see is a fully realized, incredibly detailed, three-dimensional virtual image of the china teacup floating in space (an example of this is the image of Princess Leia which gets generated by R2D2 in the first movie of the Star Wars series).” -Lynne McTaggart, “The Field: The Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe,” (83)
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2013, 09:14 PM   #294
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

3D Printing Buildings From Moon Dust
Kevin Holmes February 04, 2013
the
creators project



http://thecreatorsproject.com/blog/3...from-moon-dust
Quote:
3D printing has the potential to go places, like the moon for instance. The European Space Agency (ESA) has commissioned several architecture firms to see if buildings can be 3D printed on the moon using lunar soil.

It may sound insane, but it means that we could potentially colonize this cosmic neighbor of ours and build structures without having to export the materials there. London-based architects Foster + Partners imagined a home for four people which uses a D-Shape printer—the same one being used to build the first 3D printed house—to spray on layers of lunar soil on top of inflatable domes. This would not only give lunar travelers a solid roof over their heads, but also shield them from from space radiation too.

The idea is based on the fact that large structures have been built on earth using the D-Shape printer using layers of sand, so similar principles could be applied to the moon and its surface, with the lunar poles offering the most favorable climate. “The new possibilities this work opens up can then be considered by international space agencies as part of the current development of a common exploration strategy,” the ESA says.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2013, 09:21 PM   #295
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

Cell circuits remember their history: Engineers design new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-cell-ci...ology.html#jCp
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2013, 09:24 PM   #296
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default


18th century painting of Krishna and his consort Radha. Krishna
was an avatar of Vishnu.


Avatara: Magic of Venus and Vishnu
by Arthur Freeheart

Heart Beats Drum Lyceum
Quote:
Vishnu is the Deity most closely associated with avatarahood. Various schools of devotees believe He has various numbers of avatara incarnations. The Magic of Venus and Vishnu includes Taoist founder Lao-Tse, Christianity founder Jesus and Sufi poet Rumi on its avatara list.
Mirror of Isis - An Official Fellowship of Isis Publication

Last edited by edit; 11-02-2013 at 10:01 PM.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2013, 06:01 PM   #298
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

New cunning linguist computer has got ancient tongues licked

Boffins build system to reconstruct man's protolanguages

By Team Register • Get more from this author

Posted in Applications, 12th February 2013 13:04 GMT

Free whitepaper – FuseSource Overview


Boffins have put together a new computer system that attempts to translate protolanguages, the ancient "parent" tongues from which modern languages evolved.

The sophisticated Rosetta Stone-like system can quickly reconstruct the languages of yore from today's vocabularies with 85 per cent accuracy, we're told. The system's designers reckon it can outpace human linguists who painstakingly reconstruct protolanguages from the words we all know and use today.




With the exception of Latin - the parent of the Romance language family* - and a few others, written records of protolanguages tend to be rather rare, forcing experts to analyse modern speech to derive the parent languages. Specifically, linguists group together words with common meanings and study changes in pronunciation, among other techniques.

“We’re hopeful our tool will revolutionise historical linguistics much the same way that statistical analysis and computer power revolutionised the study of evolutionary biology,” said Alexandre Bouchard-Côté, statistics professor at the University of British Columbia and lead author of the study.

“And while our system won’t replace the nuanced work of skilled linguists, it could prove valuable by enabling them to increase the number of modern languages they use as the basis for their reconstructions.”

The new system, designed with help from colleagues at Berkeley, analyses sound-changes at basic phonetic unit level so it can operate at a much greater scale than previous computer tools.

The researchers reconstructed a set of protolanguages from a database of more than 142,000 word forms from 637 Austronesian languages for a study that will be published next week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. ®

* The group includes Spanish, Italian, French, Romanian, Neapolitan, Ladino and many more.

Free whitepaper – FuseSource Overview


Read more
Computer System
Rosetta Stone
Protolanguages
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/02...rotolanguages/
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2013, 06:03 PM   #299
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

A moon moniker: Online contest launched to name
Pluto's 2 tiny moons


http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/a-moo...oons-1.1153298
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2013, 05:31 AM   #300
edit
Senior Member
 
edit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,320
Default

Star Trek image



IBM
An atomic Star Trek image shows the USS Enterprise. IBM Research made the image with a two ton microscope that magnifies the surface 100 million times.
edit is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:31 PM.