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lumukanda
02-05-2007, 02:28 PM
i found this quite interesting, in south africa a white person is called a mlungu in xhosa or a mzungu in zulu, it basically means white person.
now i found a list of names of god in various african tribes, and that name comes up again and again. now i wonder if this is not maybe because of the nordic/reptilian hybrids being so active in the area. i don't buy the white people were so advanced they looked like gods line, i find it insulting and to be quite honest, probably quite untrue.
what is interesting is the proximity to umbaba, the copper city (http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=97), where mutwa says the king of the chitauli (african reptilians) live, and their king is, Jabulon, isn't that the masons' god?
anyone got any ideas?

here's the list :

AKAMBA (Kenya): Mulungu, Ngai, Mumbi, Mwatuangi, Asa

BEMBA (Zambia): Lesa, Mulungu, Mwandanshi, Tengenene, Katebebe, Kaleka-Misuma, Kapekape, Kalamfya-Milalo, Kanshiwabikwa, Kashawaliko, Mulopwe, Mwine-twalo, Nalusandulula, Naluntuntwe, Nalwebela, Nafukatila, Kalenga, Nakabumba, Ndubulwila

BENA (Tanzania): Mulungu

BONDEI (Tanzania): Mlungu

CHEWA (Malawi): Mulungu, Namalenga, Leza, Cham'njili, Mphambe, Chisumphi, Chanta, Mlengi, Mlamulili, Mcizi, Mpulumutsi, Mlezi, Wolera, Mtetezi, Muweluzi

DIGO (Kenya): Mulungu

DURUMA (Kenya): Mulungu

GIKUYU (Kenya): Murungu, Ngai, Mwenenyaga

GIRYAMA (Kenya): Mulungu

GOGO (Tanzania): Mulungu

HERERO (Namibia ): Ndjambi Karunga, Mukuru

LUGURU (Tanzania): Mulungu

MATENGO (Malawi): Ciuta, Mulungu, Mlezi, Cisumphi

MERU (Kenya): Murungu, Ngai, Mwene inya

NYANJA (Zambia, Malawi): Mulungu, Cuata, Leza, Mphamba, Cisumphi, Cimjili Namalenga or Nyamalenga or Mlengi

PARE (Tanzania): Kyumbi, Mrungu, Izuva

POKOMO (Kenya): Muungu

RABAI (Kenya): Mulungu

SANDAWE (Tanzania): Waronge, Murungu

SUKUMA-NYAMWEZI (Tanzania): Mulungu, Mungu, Seba, Kube, Kube-Nyangasa, Limi, Linyabangwe, Liwelelo, Ng'wenekili, Ling'wenekili, Likubala

TEITA (Kenya): Mlungu

TURU (Tanzania): Murungu, Matunda

YAO (Malawi, Mozambique): Mulungu

i also found some referring perhaps to Baal :

MAHRAKA (Sudan): Mboli

NUBA (Sudan) Kalo, Elo, Bel, Bel Epti, Kando, Kwarak, Masala, Elem

some like tammuz :

BEIR (Sudan): Tummu

MURLE (Ethiopia): Tummu

SURI-SUMMA (Ethiopia): Tuma

and even an enki amongst the masai :

MAASAI (Kenya, Tanzania): En-kai, Engai, N'gai, Ai, Parsai, Emayian

archangel
04-05-2007, 09:33 AM
Interesting....

But why do you find it strange that if the ancient anunaki gods were aryan looking the native people would use a similar world to describe aryan looking homosapiens?

lumukanda
04-05-2007, 09:50 AM
it's not that i find strange, what i find strange is that these white people, whatever they were, obviously made a massive impact on the locals there, so much so that they called them gods, this is when white people were not supposed to even be in the area, this of course is completely wrong, i mean we had arabs and chinese people trading there, there is evidence of celts being present in southern africa, see african ogham, and the cultural similarities between celts and zulus.

so the notion that just any old white man would have been amazing to locals is wrong imo, i think what we're looking at is either nordic/reptilians, pureblood nordics (i don't think so though, due to the proximity of the supposed underground reptilian city in the area) or perhaps even the high 'ranking' white reptilians, the reason i say this is that eastern coast of africa was a great place for trading, as i said before, arabs and chinese, there's even evidence that there were arabs ('...the dreaded arabi, with their curved swords and long beards...' as described by mutwa in his book 'indaba, my chirldren.) in zimbabwe. not to mention the fact that africans are central to civilization as far away as india (see synergy777's posts on the subject, absolutely fascinating stuff), and i'm sure they would've bumped into a couple of whiteys along the way.

ok, after all that i realised i haven't answered your question, but i like the above post so i'm going to keep it. :D
but what i was really getting at initially was whether the fact that the locals called white people the same as their gods is any kind of evidence of annunaki presence in the area, i'm just looking for any evidence, any smoking guns, so little is researched about ancient africa, so i'm just looking for as many clues as i can.
jesus i can ramble on and on, i hope i answered your question.

archangel
05-05-2007, 07:43 PM
hmmm....I see what your saying.

what your saying definately makes sense.

tinmenace
05-05-2007, 08:13 PM
Lumukanda said:
MAASAI (Kenya, Tanzania): En-kai, Engai, N'gai, Ai, Parsai, Emayian

That there is the most astounding thing!

You're absolutely right! Doesn't that word, 'En-kai' sound and look a LOT like En.ki?

What about the languages in Zimbabwe? Did you find anything on those?

tinmenace
05-05-2007, 08:33 PM
Lumukanda said:

...Jabulon, isn't that the masons' god?

There is another spelling of that. It's Jahbulon. I searched the Masonic Dictionary
(http://masonicdictionary.com/jah.html) and found a reference to JAH. Below is what it says.


In Hebrew M. Maimonides calls it the two-lettered name, and derives it from the Tetragrammaton, of which he says it is an abbreviation. Others have denied this, and assert that Jah is a name independent of Jehovah, but expressing the same idea of the Divine Essence. It is uniformly translated in the authorized version of the Bible by the word Lord, being thus considered as Synonymous with Jehovah, except in Psalm lxviii, 4, where the original word is preserved: "Extol Him that rideth upon the heavens by His name Jah," upon which the Targum comment is "Extol Him who sitteth on the throne of glory in the ninth heaven; Yah is His name." It seems, also to have been well known to the Gentile nations as the triliteral resume of God; for, although biliteral among the Hebrews, it assumed among the Greeks the triliteral form, as IAO Macrobius, in his Saturnalia, says that this was the sacred name of the Supreme Deity; and the Clarian Oracle being asked which of the gods was Jao, replied, "The initiated are bound to conceal the mysterious secrets. Learn thou that IAQ is the Great God Supreme who ruleth over all".

- Source: Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry

When I did a Jahbulon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopediasearch on Jabulon, this is what I found:

Jahbulon or Jabulon is a word which was used historically in some rituals of Royal Arch Masonry. In addition, according to Francis X. King, the word is used in rituals of the Ordo Templi Orientis, as Aleister Crowley had contact with various clandestine Masonic groups.

According to Masonic historian Arturo de Hoyos, the word Jahbulon was first used in the 1700s, in early French versions of the Royal Arch degree, which relate a Masonic legend, or allegory, in which Jabulon was the name of an explorer, living during the time of Solomon, who discovered the ruins of an ancient temple. Within the ruins he found a gold plate upon which the name of God (Jehovah) was engraved.

Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jahbulon)



In Albert Pike's book, Morals and Dogma, he only makes one reference to Jah, from what I can tell. It's in the very last chapter. Here's an online copy of the book (http://www.freemasons-freemasonry.com/apikefr.html) from freemasons-freemasonry.com

lumukanda
06-05-2007, 11:49 AM
That there is the most astounding thing!

You're absolutely right! Doesn't that word, 'En-kai' sound and look a LOT like En.ki?

What about the languages in Zimbabwe? Did you find anything on those?

not so much on the languages in zimbabwe, but i have found one interesting thing in zulu (the southern african languages mostly belong to the nguni language group, an offshoot of the bantu language group, which covers most of black africa, one notable exeption is the swazi, which is unlike any other group in southern africa).
in zulu, the name for writer (one who writes) is mBali, this got me thinking about Baal. Baal is not a name, it is a title, it means roughly 'lord', the feminine of the word is Baalti, 'lady'. now if we look at the procession of events, or people, it goes Enki, Marduk, Baal, some person, and in many ways i think that Baal was like a priestly title, therefore, in african the mBali may have been a priest of some sorts, after all in ancient times the only people who could write were often kings and priests, very often the two were not mutually exclusive either.
i'll give you the brief rundown of what i think happened (and this i think for now, is only on southern african tribes, i think a lot more went on up north, kenya, ethiopia etc etc).
the creator spirit is called nKulukulu, he is not god as we see it (even though some african churches to refer to god as nKulukulu), he created Ma, the first goddess who created the world.
intitially africans did not mine anything, the earth was seen as having the perfect balance of minerals, and disturbing that balance would cause dire consequences. now the thing is at some point africans did start mining, not my question is, what caused this shift in belief? traditional africans would not mine. what changed their minds?
i think at some point we had, perhaps a more powerful force that took over africa, credo mutwa speaks of the maIti, the first white colonizers, thousands of years ago, who may have imposed their beliefs on the local people.
there is a huge argument here about whether or not africans could have built great zimbabwe or not, i don't doubt they did build it, but the subsequent mining operations were not their idea intitially, this came later, due to an outside influence, a converson of sorts even, and perhaps not even the common man, but the rulers of the monopotaba dynasties that 'sold out'
now it was these outside influences that caused these names, Baal, tammuz and enki to find their way into the languages of the people.

tinmenace
06-05-2007, 02:38 PM
Yes, I remember a TV show about Great Zimbabwe. Using archaeological techniques to debate who built it. I only caught the tail end of it, but I don't think there was a conclusion.

This is all very interesting....

lumukanda
06-05-2007, 02:41 PM
well, a couple of threads here have rekindled my interest in the subject, so expect more on the ancient africans in the near future.

follower
25-11-2007, 01:57 AM
not so much on the languages in zimbabwe, but i have found one interesting thing in zulu (the southern african languages mostly belong to the nguni language group, an offshoot of the bantu language group, which covers most of black africa, one notable exeption is the swazi, which is unlike any other group in southern africa).
in zulu, the name for writer (one who writes) is mBali, this got me thinking about Baal. Baal is not a name, it is a title, it means roughly 'lord', the feminine of the word is Baalti, 'lady'. now if we look at the procession of events, or people, it goes Enki, Marduk, Baal, some person, and in many ways i think that Baal was like a priestly title, therefore, in african the mBali may have been a priest of some sorts, after all in ancient times the only people who could write were often kings and priests, very often the two were not mutually exclusive either.
i'll give you the brief rundown of what i think happened (and this i think for now, is only on southern african tribes, i think a lot more went on up north, kenya, ethiopia etc etc).
the creator spirit is called nKulukulu, he is not god as we see it (even though some african churches to refer to god as nKulukulu), he created Ma, the first goddess who created the world.
intitially africans did not mine anything, the earth was seen as having the perfect balance of minerals, and disturbing that balance would cause dire consequences. now the thing is at some point africans did start mining, not my question is, what caused this shift in belief? traditional africans would not mine. what changed their minds?
i think at some point we had, perhaps a more powerful force that took over africa, credo mutwa speaks of the maIti, the first white colonizers, thousands of years ago, who may have imposed their beliefs on the local people.
there is a huge argument here about whether or not africans could have built great zimbabwe or not, i don't doubt they did build it, but the subsequent mining operations were not their idea intitially, this came later, due to an outside influence, a converson of sorts even, and perhaps not even the common man, but the rulers of the monopotaba dynasties that 'sold out'
now it was these outside influences that caused these names, Baal, tammuz and enki to find their way into the languages of the people.

I am half Nguni and half Sotho. and Mbali means flower in the Nguni languages. It has nothing to do with Baal.

Nkulunkulu is also just a title, it means the greatest of great/Almighty. The true name for the creator God in the Nguni languages is uMveliqangi and in the Sotho languages is is Modimo.

As for the monomotapa dynasties selling out, I dont know how true that is, but every civilisation has in time......we as people should not be blaming what happend in the past anymore (although we should acknowlege it). We need to work on getting things straight for the future.

lumukanda
29-01-2008, 03:13 PM
I am half Nguni and half Sotho. and Mbali means flower in the Nguni languages. It has nothing to do with Baal.

Nkulunkulu is also just a title, it means the greatest of great/Almighty. The true name for the creator God in the Nguni languages is uMveliqangi and in the Sotho languages is is Modimo.

As for the monomotapa dynasties selling out, I dont know how true that is, but every civilisation has in time......we as people should not be blaming what happend in the past anymore (although we should acknowlege it). We need to work on getting things straight for the future.

according to credo mutwa, mBali means writer in Zulu and that connection comes from the ancient Ma-Iti priests from a long time ago. i don't speak zulu, so i have to take his word for it.

follower
31-01-2008, 03:50 PM
according to credo mutwa, mBali means writer in Zulu and that connection comes from the ancient Ma-Iti priests from a long time ago. i don't speak zulu, so i have to take his word for it.

uguBala is "to write" so uMbali can also mean a writer, but a flower in Zulu is iMbali.

http://isizulu.net/

The the Ma-Iti were Pheonicians and its very likely that they would have worshipped Baal, Credo Mutwa may have a point there (I dont really want to argue with a Sanusi's synopsis), but imbali and the name Mbali are defininetly refferences to flowers.

lumukanda
31-01-2008, 05:58 PM
follower, you are a legend! thank you for that online dictionary, i've been looking for one for a while now.

i got the bit about mBali from a book called 'Africa through the mists of time' by Brenda Sullivan, where she follows ancient african mining sites and has quite a lot of info that credo mutwa gave her (he answers quite a few letters she wrote him and these are published in the book). but you are right, it does mean flower (maybe a semarisis connection?), i should know better than to question a speaker of the language.

have you read 'indaba, my children' yet follower? i would be interested to hear your thoughts on some of the bits in there.

you know, looking at the zulu word for 'to write' uguBala also has that baal connection, thanks for the help there.

follower
01-02-2008, 11:22 PM
follower, you are a legend! thank you for that online dictionary, i've been looking for one for a while now.

i got the bit about mBali from a book called 'Africa through the mists of time' by Brenda Sullivan, where she follows ancient african mining sites and has quite a lot of info that credo mutwa gave her (he answers quite a few letters she wrote him and these are published in the book). but you are right, it does mean flower (maybe a semarisis connection?), i should know better than to question a speaker of the language.

have you read 'indaba, my children' yet follower? i would be interested to hear your thoughts on some of the bits in there.

you know, looking at the zulu word for 'to write' uguBala also has that baal connection, thanks for the help there.

Yes I have read Indaba my children, its one of my favorite books. I see your screen name is inspired by the blind immortal lol

I think Ill have to buy that book by Brenda Sullivan, thanks for mentioning it.

lumukanda
02-02-2008, 09:41 AM
np, another good book dealing with african mysteries is linda tucker's 'Mystery of the White Lions', it deals with the white lions of timbavati and how their coming heralds an important change in the world.
credo mutwa wrote the forward and also began her intitiation into the african mysteries, she also speaks at length to maria khoza, a sangoma who can speak to lions, all in all a very informative read.